Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Noticing What Isn't Supposed To Be Noticed

As soon as I saw this headline on google news "Mother 'invented disabled children to collect £1million in benefits'" I immediately guessed something about the defendant, I was right.

If you can't guess what I'm referring to have a look at these recent fraud cases and see what they have in common. You can almost taste the vibrancy coming off these trials.

Update: Someone else has spotted the pattern too.

9 comments:

Lord James Bigglesworth said...

Yes but don't put it in a cartoon, Ross.

Join Bloghounds instead.

:)

John M Ward said...

Ooh, I don't know whether I am now allowed to mention the common factor in these cases...

When I worked in the Immigration Dept of the Home Office, and visited our Intelligence Unit at Harmondsworth, one of the (many) things I learned was of one particular nation's nationals' practice of travelling on forged "stitched-up" passports.

These were notable by being detached from one side of the (green) cardboard cover, and the various pages being of at least two different shades, showing they did not originally come from the same passport.

It will come as no surprise to the more perceptive that there would be at least one stitched-in page, and it would be on this page (or as many pages as were necessary) that the "permission to enter the UK" would be found.

No prizes are offered for working out which country that was...

John East said...

I think I sort of admire Nigerians, particularly the ones who frequently take the trouble to e-mail me with offers of vast wealth. If only I could take them up, but my vows of chastity and poverty prevent me following up these generous offers.

Fidothedog said...

I have just done a post on some dubious Nigerians...

Ross said...

"I think I sort of admire Nigerians, particularly the ones who frequently take the trouble to e-mail me with offers of vast wealth."

Of all types of criminality fraud is the most inventive, and at least with the email scams they generally target the greedy or the gullible.

James G. said...

A Nigerian friend of mine pointed out the imagination involved in running many of these scams, and often wondered aloud what sort of shape Nigeria would be in if people put their imagination to more productive enterprises than ripping off their neighbour...

Dangerouslysubversivedad said...

http://www.419eater.com/html/letters.htm

JuliaM said...

Let's be fair, everyone. It isn't always Nigerians...

Anonymous said...

hmm, cant even trust the *professional* ones...

http://tinyurl.co.uk/5h82